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As a textbook Type-A individual, I can tell you (in excruciating detail) the exact areas of my home that are not organized in a satisfactory way.

In no specific order:
1. The wooden trunk at the foot of our bed.
2. The file cabinet next to the desk.
3. The desk drawer.
4. The back shelves of our front closet.
5. The tupperware cabinet.
6. The linen closet.
7. The corner of our bedroom next to Joey’s side of the bed that I am perpetually trying to make peace with because the dude needs one corner that his wife leaves alone.

Sometimes, when it looks like I’m spacing off, I’m thinking terrible thoughts about these areas of the apartment. Terrible thoughts.

I bring this up because, prior to this weekend, there was one other thing on that list: my wardrobe.

I’m pretty good about cleaning out my closet regularly. I’ve said before that I try to do this at least twice a year, and it’s always the first thing I think of when I start to get serious about simplifying.

Putting it bluntly, I love shopping. I love new clothes, I love styling outfits. It’s a serious hobby of mine. The problem is when that “hobby” translates into too little closet space and too small of a savings account. Since cutting back on shopping was one of my simplification goals, I decided that paring down what I had (but never wore) should come next.

Of course, when you love shopping, there is nothing less fun that not shopping and getting rid of clothes. So I decided to find a way to make it more fun.

Enter the clothing swap.

About a year ago, I did a cross-country swap with two of my blogger friends, Kayla and Madison. I had so much fun styling the new clothes (and seeing how they styled mine), and I had been meaning to replicate the experience with some of my local friends for a while. Well, after a conversation with five of my pals about how we were all wanting to simplify and spend more money, the swap basically planned itself.

And you know what? It was actually way more fun that just shopping. We ate snacks, chatted, and had fun trying on things we might never have purchased on our own. Everyone got rid of at least a bag or two of old clothes, and almost everyone walked away with a few new things.

Here are a few tips for planning your own clothing swap:

1. Start with a clean space.
Between the six of us, we had about eight bags of clothes to go through. I was so glad that I had gone through my own clothes in advance and made room in my bedroom for us to spread everything out. Plus, if you’re working in a messy space, things that you don’t want to swap are bound to get mixed in. Bonus points if you have a movable clothing rack to display everything on and help keep things organized.

2. Size up your guest list.
GET IT? But seriously. Your entire guest list does not have to be the same size (odds are you are not only friends with people who share your pant size), but everyone should be close enough that exchanges can be made. For example, one of my friends is busty-er with a narrow waist, another is smaller on top with a curvier booty, another is slender all over, another has a perfect hourglass, etc. The idea is that everyone shares at least one size (whether it’s dresses, skirts, tops, or whatever) with at least one other person at the party. Plus, if you are like my group, some of the things are getting tossed because they don’t fit anymore, so they will probably fit someone else.

3. Have a full-length mirror handy.
You are essentially turning your home into a dressing room — good lighting and a full-length mirror or two are crucial.

4. Mind the menu.
This might be over-thinking things, but consider serving a healthy-ish meal with more decadent treats after everyone has tried on clothes. Maybe it’s just me, but I never feel my best after I eat something high-calorie or fattening, and I certainly don’t feel like trying on clothes. So instead of pizza, we had a giant salad with grilled chicken and veggies with hummus. Then, when the clothes had been doled out, we ate cookies. Because we’re only human, you guys.

5. Have a plan for what gets leftover.
Fortunately with this group of girls, no one was offended if any of their clothes went unclaimed. Prior to the swap, we just agreed anything leftover would get donated. The bonus of the backup plan is that no one is tempted to take home anything they don’t love just because they don’t want to see it thrown out. SOMEONE will benefit it — it just won’t be someone from our group.

Post-swap, I’m pretty pleased to report that I have three new skirts and a top — AND a super-organized closet that makes it a million times easier to decide what to wear each day.

Have you hosted a clothing swap? What tips can you pass along?

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