Things I Like

Ok, so Monday we covered the marathon. Now it’s time to talk about the more fun (and less sweaty) portions of my trip. Like the wine. And the architecture. And the wine.

francetrip

{1} We arrived in Paris around 11:00 a.m. Our luggage hadn’t made our connecting flight, so we headed to our apartment expecting it to be delivered between 3 and 8 p.m. (Because that’s what the airport told us.) We booked our apartment through Vacation in Paris, which I highly recommend. Our 2-bedroom apartment also had a living room and kitchen (plus a washer/dryer), which was not only plenty of room but also made it possible for us to have a few meals at home. There’s just something a million times more enjoyable about relaxing in a real living room than in a depressing tiny hotel room. This was our actual rental if anyone is looking for a place to stay near Paris.

Joey’s and Diana’s bags (mine was still MIA) didn’t end up arriving until about 10:30 p.m., so we had to cancel our dinner reservation. Instead, we grocery shopped and snacked on cheese and wine at the apartment. Di and I also picked up our race packets from the expo (and may have grabbed a celebratory glass of champagne).

{2} The Paris Marathon offered a 5K “Breakfast” Run the morning before the marathon. I’m putting breakfast in quotes because it was literally bananas and bottles of water, but it was nice to take an easy jog through the streets of Paris.

{3} That night, we had dinner at La Gauloise, a charming, very French restaurant where we consumed as many carbs as possible for the impending race. That included what can only be described as the best chocolate mousse I’ve ever had. EVER. Seriously, if you go here and do not order the mousse, you have done your mouth a disservice it should never forgive you for.

{5} Race day. After the run, we headed back to the hotel to rest up and shower before going out for the evening. We broke tradition and had Italian for dinner at a place called Fuxia, which I’ve sinced learned is actually a chain. The food was SO GOOD, and I’m not just saying that because I had just burned 2,500 calories. Plus, the staff was extremely nice, which can be kind of rare in Paris.

{6} For me, the real vacation didn’t start until the marathon ended. For the first time in over three months, my whole life didn’t revolve around my running schedule. It was pretty freeing. We had been pretty sure we would be sore the day after (we were right), so we had booked an hour-long cruise on the Seine with Vedettes du Pont Neuf to see a few landmarks without having to stand up. The cruises feature a student tour guide who describes the surroundings in both French and English, and you’re allowed to bring drinks and snacks aboard. (We may have brought a bottle of champagne.)(I imagine you’re picking up on the theme of the trip by now.)

{7} After the boat ride, we grabbed lunch at a cafe along the river before hitting up a few shops (I still didn’t have my bag, so I needed underwear, yo) and doing some more sightseeing. Dinner was at Au Pied de Fouet, an 8-table restaurant that literally defines hole-in-the-wall. It has been in business for over 150 years without changing much (they’ve added a bathroom in the last ten years), at it’s about as French as it gets.

{8} The original plan for Tuesday was to hit up a market in the morning, visit Monet’s home and gardens during the day, and then cook dinner at home that night. Finding the market took a bit longer than expected, though, and by the time we’d returned home and eaten lunch, we were kind of pooped. Instead, we pushed the Monet visit to Friday.

But can we just talk about this market for a minute? If you go to Paris any time in the near future, I strongly suggesting visiting. It was probably my best impression of the French the entire time. Not only was all the food we purchased incredibly fresh and delicious, but every single person we came in contact with was extremely kind. (It helps that Diana speaks really great French, but locals were even nice to me with my not-at-all perfect Français.)

Bonus: My luggage arrived that night. Yay!

{9} Wednesday was wine tour day. We started the day bright and early at a cafe where we met our all-day wine tour group. Paris Wine Day Tours take a group of up to eight people to tour a local market, vineyard, and chateau in France’s wine regions Sancerre, Pouilly-Fumé and Coteaux du Giennois. The tour guide picks everyone up in a van around 7:30 a.m., and it takes about an hour to get to the first stop. At the market, we were able to sample a few local treats like goat cheese and chocolate truffles. In other words, everything I love to eat. {10} After that, we visited a family-owned wine estate, Domaine de Villargeau. There we sampled about five different wines and learned about how French wine is made. We brought home three bottles, so, what I’m saying is, we liked it. {11} Next, we toured what was probably the most picturesque village in all of France. Seriously, I’m pretty sure the song “Belle” was written about this town. We also got to see a few stunning vistas of the French countryside. {12} Finally, we toured a family-owned chateau and garden. I may or may not want to live in a castle now.

{13} Thursday was our anniversary. We slept in a bit, then wandered to a park Diana had discovered online called Bois de Boulogne. And, you guys? I’m still not entirely convinced this park wasn’t a dream we all had simultaneously — it was that perfect. The weather was beyond gorgeous, there was grass to stretch out on, there was a pond with ducks and geese, and everyone in the park had super friendly, well-trained dogs they let just wander over to you so you could pet them for a while. Diana went for a stroll and accidentally found a cafe about two minutes from where we were picnicking that served rosé and gelato. (Her exact words when she came back were, “I don’t even know if I can say these words out loud, but do you see those orange chairs over there?” My response: “Diana, I know it’s my anniversary, but you didn’t have to get me every single thing I like.”)

{14} After the park, Diana went to grab a drink with some friends she had in the area while Joey and I got ready for dinner. We made a quick pit stop at Pont de l’Archevêché, which is famous for couples locking locks onto it’s sides and then throwing the keys into the Seine to symbolize the eternity of their love. It was a tradition I hadn’t known about when we visited Paris on our honeymoon, so I was happy to check off this bucket list item on this trip.

{15} Next was dinner at Ciel de Paris, which sits on the 65th floor of one of the tallest buildings in Paris and provides a panoramic view of the entire city. If you go, try to make your reservation as far in advance as you can so you can request a table near the window. We had a spectacular sunset and were there when the Eiffel Tour light show began.

{16} On Friday, Joey and I finally visited Monet’s house and garden, something I’ve wanted to do ever since I was a little girl. It was, in a word, spectacular. Giverny is so beautiful, I completely understand why Monet spotted it out a train window and had to live there. The gardens themselves are one of the most colorful things I’ve ever seen, and the house is adorable — most of the rooms are done all in one color, giving the feeling of being inside a doll house. Basically, Monet had good taste.

After that, it was time to head to the airport for an overnight flight to Moscow, our layover. (I know…it was weird.) We actually ended up spending about 12 hours there, but that’s a story for another post. We finally got back to New York on Saturday.

All in all, it was a great trip. The weather, food, and experiences were incredible. I’m not sure when the next time I’ll visit Paris will be (there are too many other locations on my list to visit), but it was definitely a fantastic way to celebrate our third anniversary.

 

I’m in my last week of tapering before the marathon, which has been the perfect excuse to try a few new cross training classes with my ClassPass. This week, I was finally able to get into a class I’ve been eyeing for a couple of months, The Fhitting Room.

studio2

The Gym
Space: The space is small, with a compact lobby, two bathrooms, lockers, and a single room for workouts (they classes are capped at 16, but only six people were in my class). There are no showers.
Cleanliness: Very clean. The instructors re-rack all of your equipment along the way so you never have to stop working out to put away a kettle bell or something.
Attitude: Great! The instructors babied me a bit in the beginning of the class, which is a pet peeve of mine (just because I’ve never been here doesn’t mean I’ve never worked out before), but after I’d proven that I could do more pushups than the other girls, they treated me like part of the team.

The Workout
Difficulty (Out of 10, 1 being “could do it in my sleep” and 10 being “omg I can’t walk”): 8/9. Fhitting Room offers high intensity training (HIT) classes where you do the same move for 30 seconds to a minute, rest for 15 seconds, and then repeat or move in a circuit. There is very little rest time, so you pack a lot of workout into a short amount of time. My class combined a series of rowing, pushups on the TRX, squats on a Bosu ball, burpees, kettle bell swings, plié squats, and arm raises along with cardio moves like mountain climbers and jumping jacks. It’s intense, and you work out just about every part of your body.
Experience: Really good! I felt challenged, but not like the moves were impossible (the way I feel when I’m staring down monkey bars or something), and I definitely worked to fatigue with every set.
Afterburn (how I felt the next day): My shoulders and bum are really sore, but I know I’ve been neglected strength moves while training. This class has inspired me to be more diligent about it once the marathon is over.

Final grade: A+! I’m definitely planning to do this one again.

Anyone wanna come with me?

{photo credit}

First, thank you for all the kind words so many of you sent me after reading this post. I didn’t write it in a cheap attempt to get compliments (I swear, I really am over it now), but it was still nice to realize how far that support system I mentioned reaches. You’re all wonderful.

Now, let’s talk about something frivolous, shall we?

As you may know (from the 8 million times I mention it), I’m taking a little trip this week. To Paris. The primary purpose is to run my first full marathon, but the rest of the week will be dedicated to enjoying France. (Life is such a trial sometimes, isn’t it?)

I started packing last night, and then I thought, you know what I haven’t done in a while? Written a “what to wear” post. Heaven forbid this blog goes legit and only posts about feelings, right?

Here are three variations of outfits I’ve put together for three of the activities I’m most looking forward to on our trip. You know, just in case anyone out there is looking for a little Parisian inspiration.

First, a general sight-seeing uniform:

Paris Sightseeing

Next up, what I plan to wear whilst touring Monet’s gardens:

Touring Monet's Garden

And finally, my ensemble for our all-day wine tour:

French Wine Country

I’m hoping to contain my overpacking instincts by sticking to a simple color palette — only black, white, navy, and pink/coral are making the cut. Anyone else have good tips to avoid overpacking for long-ish trips?

I can’t even begin to express how excited I am for this trip! I’ll be back in a week with (hopefully) tons of great photos and stories to share. À bientôt!

Today’s post is brought to you by, Grammerly! I use Grammerly’s plagiarism checker because the only time copying is okay is when you’re stealing my top knot tutorial. Thanks, Grammerly!

The month is winding down (thank goodness…does anyone love February? And this one has been especially brutal), which means it’s time for the most recent installment about what has been flipping through my Kindle lately. Ready? And GO:

Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter
What it’s about: This is a multi-perspective story that jumps back and forth between past and present. In the past, an Italian small-time hotelier crosses paths with a hauntingly beautiful American actress who bears a secret. They’re together for just over a day before she is torn away from him by a budding director (and Richard Burton, incidentally), but he is never able to fully escape her memory. In the future, that budding director has made a name for himself creating the types of TV shows most of us admit watching with sheepish grins, and his production assistant is ready to quit her soul-sucking job when a handsome wannabe film writer and an elderly Italian man stumble into her office late one night, each with his own mission to reclaim a life he used to think was out of reach.

What I thought: I really admire the way Jess Walter can paint a lifetime in just a few words. She never overwhelms with details, but her writing style is more what I would describe as impressionist — a fleeting glimpse manages to tell you an entire story. And this particular story is packed with truly lovely moments of despair and redemption that captured my attention completely. Highly recommend.

Where’d You Go, Bernadette? by Maria Semple
What it’s about: After the disappearance of Bernadette Fox, a notorious PTA-torturing, impulsive decision-making, revolutionary building-designing wife and mother in Seattle, her daughter sets out to follow a paper trail of emails, notes, and official documents that led up to what made her mysteriously vanish. The resulting compilation results in a story that is equal parts touchingly relatable and laugh-out-loud absurd. But as to whether it leads to Bernadette…well, you’ll have to read to find out.

What I thought: I love love love this book. The character portrayals are so hilariously vivid, and the way the story is laid out is unique without being difficult to follow. It’s an easy read (pick it up for your next vacation), but still whip-smart in a way that keeps you engrossed until the very end.

Wild (From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail) by Cheryl Strayed
What it’s about: At 22, Cheryl Strayed’s life has fallen apart. After the devastating death of her mother, she starts down a self-destructive path of drugs and infidelity that leads to a divorce and depression. In an effort to take control of her life again, Cheryl impulsively decided to hike 1,100 miles along the Pacific Crest Trail — completely alone — for three months.

What I thought: I had mixed feelings about this one. On one hand, it’s a tremendous adventure. I had just started training for my marathon when I started reading it, so in a weird way, I could relate to her physical struggles through inclement weather, constant exhaustion, and near ravenous hunger. I also appreciate a fair amount of self-reflection as much as the next gal. What I didn’t like…is that there isn’t that much of a story here. I feel bad saying that because it was obviously such a huge moment in time for the author, and I’m sure if I had gone through something similar, it would have meant more to me. But the bulk of this book is self-redemption. The trail hiking itself is merely environment, and I guess I had hoped for more of a story there. I think my feelings were entirely personal because I have a hard time relating to and sympathizing with self-destructive people, so in the end, I didn’t really like Cheryl all that much. But it’s still an interesting book about an interesting experience. If you’ve read it, I’d love to know if you’re in the camp of people who wanted to hike the trail after you’d finished, or if it made you swear off hiking ever.

Wool Omnibus Edition by Hugh Howey
What it’s about: You should have known I couldn’t go a whole month without a single science fiction novel. Wool Omnibus Edition is actually a collection of five short stories that Hugh Howey initially released online. As their popularity grew, a publisher purchased the stories, but Hugh apparently put it in his contract that they had to remain available online. I’m only sharing that anecdote because it made me like Howey even more — he loves his fans.

Anyway, the story. It’s set in the (not-too-distant) future, when society lives in an underground silo that stretches 150 stories into the earth. No one is allowed to go outside because some kind of disaster has rendered the planet unlivable — there’s something in the air that eats through just about anything, and the landscape that is visible through a variety of cameras stationed outside the silo is entirely barren and hostile. It’s illegal to even suggest the thought of going outside, and the punishment is that you are “put to cleaning,” meaning you don a special suit designed to let you live outside for a limited time so you can clean the cameras for the rest of the silo’s benefit. Then, without exception, the atmosphere eats through your suit and you die on one of the surrounding hills in full view of the cameras you just cleaned. But, of course, that isn’t the whole story, and the when the silo’s new sheriff steps into the shoes of the most recent cleaning victim, she starts to figure out there’s more to the silo and its origin than meets the eye.

What I thought: You have so many questions from the start of this book, it’s nearly impossible to stop reading. There are so many mysteries to be uncovered about what is really going on, plus enough harrowing moments where lives literally hang in the balance, it’s not the kind of book you casually read. I would recommend this if you’re one of those people who likes books about how we’ve destroyed the planet and have to figure out how to go on. (That should really be its own genre, don’t you think?)

First Shift/Second Shift by Hugh Howey
What it’s about: These two books are the prequels to the Wool series. There’s actually a Third Shift that I haven’t read yet (because my brother hasn’t sent it to me…hint hint). But these books answer a lot of the questions the other five stories leave behind, including what led up to the destruction of the earth and the existence of the silos. Apparently the third book is what really ties them together chronologically, but I’ll let you know for sure when I read it.

What I thought: If you liked the other ones, you will like these. And yes, you should read them in the same order I did. Knowing how things end up actually made these two books easier to follow for me.

What have you been reading?

It’s kind of ironic that I’m a runner because I tend to get bored with the same kind of workout if I do it for weeks on end.

I guess I stick with running because, when you’re training for a race, you’re always striving for different distances. If the end goal changes, it’s a little easier to stay focused.

For other workout classes, though, I’ve never been able to do the same thing for more than a year. So I was pretty intrigued when Diana introduced me to Classtivity.

For $99, you get ten classes that you can redeem at basically every boutique gym in the city. (They’re also in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Miami, Seattle, and D.C.) You can “spend” all ten classes at the same gym, or try ten different ones. There’s a whole range of classes from yoga and pilates to boot camps and spin, so it’s impossible to get bored.

The cost breaks down to about $10 per class, which, in this city, is an amazing deal. (The average class you take would typically cost around $40-$50.)

A big part of training for the marathon is cross training my legs and strengthening my core and upper body, so clearly this kind of deal interested me.

And just so things don’t get monotonous around here, I thought it could be interested to share what I think of the new classes I’m taking. Maybe not. But maybe? I’ll rate the gyms and the classes? Eh?

Here we go!

Last night, I took a Core Fusion Barre Class at Exhale New York in Soho.

The Gym
Space: The gym was on the second floor of the building. The overall space wasn’t exceptionally large (the lobby was downright cramped as one class files out and the other files in), but the actual studio was fine. There are two dressing rooms with curtain doors and one bathroom. You keep your belongings in cubbies.
Cleanliness: Super clean. You spend a couple of minutes before class wiping down the barre, weights, mats, etc. They also have fancy soaps and stuff in the bathroom so you can wash your face, which I always appreciate.
Attitude: Excellent. Not a snob to be found. My teacher, Erin, was incredibly sweet and encouraging but still pushed you to push yourself.

The Workout
Difficulty (Out of 10, 1 being “could do it in my sleep” and 10 being “omg I can’t walk”): Easily a 9. This class. This class is so hard. I am not a weak person, and I never wimp out on finishing sets, and I had to wimp out so many times. Remember how sweet I was saying Erin was? Behind that pretty smile, there lies a drill sergeant. She told us mid-class that a professional dancer friend of hers once almost threw up in the middle of her class. So…don’t feel bad if it’s tough for you. (Each move can be modified, though, so don’t be too scared!)
Experience: This one was a great workout. Every part of my body felt strengthened, and you get that ballet/pilates feel of stretching all your muscles while they’re strengthened. Just go in expecting it will be hard, but totally worth it. (Plus, each of the workout “sets” only takes about three minutes, and then you stretch. It just feels like an eternity.) And I don’t know about you, but I always feel significantly fancier working out with a ballet barre. So there’s that.
Afterburn (how I felt the next day): As soon as I left the class, I already felt that muscle “buzzing” feeling that I get after a long run. My body is a little sore this morning, but not in a bad way. I’m glad the overall soreness isn’t too bad because I have to run ten miles in a few hours.

Final grade: A+! I’m definitely planning to do this one again.

Ok, so was that helpful? Have I convinced any of you to join me next time? I’m taking another new class tomorrow, so maybe that will be a post later this week.

Have a great weekend!

I’ve been saying for about three years that I really need to decorate our bedroom.

You know, basically since we had an “our bedroom.”

In my defense, I’ve tried. I’ve made loads of plans, even bought a few different bedspreads, but for whatever reason, the room never came together. Part of the problem was that it also doubled as storage since apartments never seem to have enough closets.

Lately, though, I’ve finally gotten to a point where I’ve simplified our belongings enough that pretty much everything has it’s own place, and I even found a look I loved online that I worked to recreate. Plus, a week off of work over the holidays to actually accomplish my lofty goals didn’t hurt.

The room isn’t totally done (I’m thinking of changing the curtains, and I have a picture I want to get blown up to poster-size for the wall), but for the first time, it looks like someone actually put some thought into it. Which obviously means I have to share it with all of you.

For reference, here’s what it looked like before.

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Processed with VSCOcam

Yikes, right? I’m a bit mortified to even share these. To be fair, I’m pretty sure I was also going through our closets that day. But seriously, we lived like that for at least a week or two.

Here’s what it looks like now:

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Processed with VSCOcam with c1 preset

Isn’t that just a breath of fresh air after the “before” photos?

Besides finally clearing out all those clothes (thereby creating more space to store what we actually need to keep), I also adjusted the layout by moving our full-length mirror over by the window. Not only did this give me the space to put our laundry hamper behind the doors where it doesn’t have to be the first thing you see, it’s also better lit for using the mirror anyway.

Then I re-framed a few of our favorite photos to create a gallery wall above the bed. Plus, I got new bedding that I am in love with. (Product sources below.)

I feel like I’m finally getting closer to that goal of a grown-up bedroom. Is it too late to add that to my list of goals for the year?

Resource guide:Duvet cover/shams: Signature Stripe Duvet Set in Navy from One Kings Lane
Floral throw pillows: Olive and Garden on Etsy (no longer available, but the fabric is Waverly Formosa)
Bed Frame and Dresser: PB Teen (literally the bed I had when I was a teen)
Mirror: IKEA
White picture frames: IKEA
Deer Head: Z Gallerie (I told a few people it was from West Elm, and I realized when writing this post I was wrong. Sorry, guys! This just shows you how long ago it was that I ordered the dang thing.)